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OSU Researchers: Vitamins C & D can help prevent COVID-19

The Statesman Journal reports on research of Adrian Gombart and collaborators from all over the world

Gombart's research found that vitamins C and D, and other micronutrients can be a a "safe, effective and low-cost" means to fight off COVID-19 and other acute respiratory tract diseases. 

Because people are simply not getting enough of these vital nutrients through their diets, researchers are urging people to not only a take a daily multivitamin but doses of 200 milligrams or more of vitamin C — higher than the suggested federal guidelines of 75 milligrams for men and 50 for women — and 2,000 international units of vitamin D.

Vitamin C 
is present in Citrus Fruits & Many Vegetables. 
Supplements Help YOU get enough

Vitamin D
comes from the sunshine. 
Supplements Help YOU get more of what you need

OSU Researchers: Vitamins C & D can help prevent COVID-19

Supplements containing vitamins C and D, along with other micronutrients, can be a "safe, effective and low-cost" means to fight off COVID-19 and other acute respiratory tract diseases, according to an Oregon State University researcher.
Adrian Gombart of OSU’s Linus Pauling Institute, along with his collaborators at universities across the world, said public health officials should issue a clear set of nutritional guidelines to complement the existing advice about washing hands to prevent the spread of infections.

Findings were published Thursday in the peer-reviewed journal Nutrients. (See additional info below)
“Around the world, acute respiratory tract infections kill more than 2.5 million people every year,” Gombart said. “Meanwhile, there’s a wealth of data that shows the role that good nutrition plays in supporting the immune system.  (we quote the full article below)
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Oregon State University researcher: Vitamins C, D can help prevent COVID-19
(The whole article) 

This story is being offered free of charge as a public service during the COVID-19 pandemic. 
Supplements containing vitamins C and D, along with other micronutrients, can be a "safe, effective and low-cost" means to fight off COVID-19 and other acute respiratory tract diseases, according to an Oregon State University researcher.
Adrian Gombart of OSU’s Linus Pauling Institute, along with his collaborators at universities across the world, said public health officials should issue a clear set of nutritional guidelines to complement the existing advice about washing hands to prevent the spread of infections.

Findings were published Thursday in the peer-reviewed journal Nutrients.

“Around the world, acute respiratory tract infections kill more than 2.5 million people every year,” Gombart said. “Meanwhile, there’s a wealth of data that shows the role that good nutrition plays in supporting the immune system.
Adrian Gombart, an associate professor at the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University, is an expert on vitamin D and the immune system. 

As a society, we need to be doing a better job of getting that message across along with the other important, more common messages.”

Because people are simply not getting enough of these vital nutrients through their diets, researchers are urging people to not only a take a daily multivitamin but doses of 200 milligrams or more of vitamin C — higher than the suggested federal guidelines of 75 milligrams for men and 50 for women — and 2,000 international units of vitamin D.

Gombart is a professor of biochemistry and biophysics in the OSU College of Science and a principal investigator at the Linus Pauling Institute, a leader in the study of micronutrients and their role in promoting optimum health or preventing and treating disease.

He collaborated with nutritional experts and scientists at the University of Southampton in England, the University of Otago in New Zealand, and University Medical Center in The Netherlands.

The role nutrition plays in supporting the immune system is well-established. 

The panel of experts looked at clinical trials, human studies, and research papers before reaching their findings.
Gombart most people are fairly healthy even when they don't get enough micronutrients. They don't always see the deficiency until their immune system is tested.

This makes getting enough vitamin C or D so that an immune system is functioning at its fullest when it does encounter an infection a key part of disease prevention.

But despite their promise at preventing infections, these micronutrients are no "miracle cure."

"You're not going to take a bunch of vitamin D and all of a sudden you're cured of something when you have an infection," Gombart said.

Optimal Nutritional Status for a Well-Functioning Immune System 
Is an Important Factor to Protect against Viral Infections
(additional research)

Public health practices including hand washing and vaccinations help reduce the spread and impact of infections.
Nevertheless, the global burden of infection is high, and additional measures are necessary.
Acute respiratory tract infections, for example, were responsible for approximately 2.38 million deaths worldwide in 2016.
The role nutrition plays in supporting the immune system is well-established.

A wealth of mechanistic and clinical data show that vitamins, including:
 - Vitamins A, B6, B12, C, D, E, and folate
 - Trace elements, including zinc, iron, selenium, magnesium, and copper
  - and the omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid
These nutrients all play important and complementary roles in supporting the immune system.

Inadequate intake and status of these nutrients are widespread, leading to a decrease in resistance to infections and as a consequence an increase in disease burden.

Against this background the following conclusions are made:
 1. supplementation with the above micro-nutrients and omega-3 fatty acids is a safe, effective, and low-cost strategy to help support optimal immune function.

 2. supplementation above the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA), but within recommended upper safety limits, for specific nutrients such as vitamins C and D is warranted.

 3. public health officials are encouraged to include nutritional strategies in their recommendations to improve public health. 

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